2021 popular My discount Own lowest Two Feet: A Memoir sale

2021 popular My discount Own lowest Two Feet: A Memoir sale

2021 popular My discount Own lowest Two Feet: A Memoir sale
2021 popular My discount Own lowest Two Feet: A Memoir sale_top

Description

Product Description

Told in her own words, My Own Two Feet is Newbery Medal–winning author Beverly Cleary’s second heartfelt and relatable memoir.

The New Yorker called Beverly Cleary''s first volume of memoirs, A Girl From Yamhill, "a warm, honest book, as interesting as any novel."

Now the creator of the classic children''s stories millions grew up with continues her own fascinating story. Here is Beverly Cleary, from college years to the publication of her first book. It is a fascinating look at her life and a writing career that spans three generations, continuing to capture the hearts and imaginations of children of all ages throughout the world.

Beverly Cleary''s books have sold more than 85 million copies and have been translated into twenty-nine different languages, which speaks to the worldwide reach and love of her stories. She was honored with a Newbery Honor for Ramona and Her Father and a second one for Ramona Quimby, Age 8. She received the John Newbery Medal for Dear Mr. Henshaw, which was inspired by letters she’d received from children. Her autobiographies, A Girl from Yamhill and My Own Two Feet, are a wonderful way to get to know more about this most beloved children''s book author.

Review

"Beverly Cleary brings the same verve to her own story that has made her fiction classic for nearly 50 years."--"Kirkus Reviews"Cleary will endear herself even more to her fans with this account of her struggle for independence." --"Publishers Weekly"Cleary recalls the past with humor, affection, and insight. Those who have always admired her books will have an even greater admiration for the author."--"Horn Book

From the Back Cover

The New Yorker called Beverly Cleary''s first volume of memoirs, A Girl From Yamhill, a warm, honest book, as interesting as any novel. Now the creator of the classic children''s stories millions grew up with continues her own fascination story. Here is Beverly Cleary, from college years to the publication of her first book. It is a fascinating look at her life and a writing career that spans three generations, continuing to capture the hearts and imaginations of children of all ages throughout the world.

About the Author

Beverly Cleary is one of America''s most beloved authors. As a child, she struggled with reading and writing. But by third grade, after spending much time in her public library in Portland, Oregon, she found her skills had greatly improved. Before long, her school librarian was saying that she should write children''s books when she grew up.

Instead she became a librarian. When a young boy asked her, "Where are the books about kids like us?" she remembered her teacher''s encouragement and was inspired to write the books she''d longed to read but couldn''t find when she was younger. She based her funny stories on her own neighborhood experiences and the sort of children she knew. And so, the Klickitat Street gang was born!

Mrs. Cleary''s books have earned her many prestigious awards, including the American Library Association''s Laura Ingalls Wilder Award, presented to her in recognition of her lasting contribution to children''s literature. Dear Mr. Henshaw won the Newbery Medal, and Ramona Quimby, Age 8 and Ramona and Her Father have been named Newbery Honor Books. Her characters, including Beezus and Ramona Quimby, Henry Huggins, and Ralph, the motorcycle-riding mouse, have delighted children for generations.

Product information

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Videos

Help others learn more about this product by uploading a video!
Upload video
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who bought this item also bought

Customer reviews

4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
205 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Laura D
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
As Wonderful and Readable As Her Own Novels Are!
Reviewed in the United States on July 13, 2017
I loved reading this book and the first memoir, A Girl from Yamhill. But I have to make this comment: What utterly cruel (and mostly female!) adults were in Beverly''s life. My jaw dropped while reading of the relentlessly vindictive pettiness of so many of the older... See more
I loved reading this book and the first memoir, A Girl from Yamhill. But I have to make this comment: What utterly cruel (and mostly female!) adults were in Beverly''s life. My jaw dropped while reading of the relentlessly vindictive pettiness of so many of the older women -- deans, housemothers, professors, library science instructors -- Beverly and her classmates had to endure while getting their college education during the mid-1930''s, always spoiling these girls'' chances and tormenting them with their deliberate and intentional cruelty. A C grade given for A work because the old bat librarian instructor "didn''t like the bored expression on Beverly''s face during class"? Another gym teacher failing Beverly''s friend because she couldn''t compose a tap dance on the spot, so the poor girl could not ever graduate from college? A martinet housemother who grimly enjoyed seeing the dorm girls starve over their inedible meals? Was it the times, or just a bunch of emotionally sick old women living in the Pacific West who relished doing everything they could to thwart youngsters coming up in the world, because they happened to have the power of being on a university faculty and were therefore permitted to do so? Beverly wrote with tempered restraint and evenness, but it''s all very apparent how resentful, envious, and jealous these dour older women were about their students or the charges they supervised in living arrangements. Middle-aged myself, I never would have dreamed of committing such sadistic cat-and-mouse games on the work study students I''ve supervised over the years in my academic office. I wanted those sweet kids to get ahead and succeed, not see them as victims I could resentfully and spitefully bully.

I won''t even go into the nearly sociopathic Mrs. Bunn, a ghastly manipulator with no honest affection for her own daughter -- imagine wearing her daughter''s DRESS to meet the fiance, not to mention all the other coldly monstrous things this hyper-critical, controlling, unhappy woman emotionally tortured her own daughter with over the years. I would love to read a third autobiography that somehow Beverly -- now I''m sure too old to write another book at age over 100! -- had gotten those two toxic parents completely out of her life. The Depression didn''t "steal their happiness" as she said. They were just mean, nasty, sour people who resented anyone else having youth and a chance at conducting her own fulfilling life. They never should have had a child, but then, of course, we never would have had wonderful Beverly Cleary and her delightful books. At least her husband and children gave her happiness and she had a lot of friends, and deservedly a lot of admirers who appreciated her talent. And, bravest of all, she was happy and successful despite her parents. Her father was kinder and milder, but still an enabler of her dominating mother and therefore just as much to blame. Such people could absolutely ruin a less stronger child, destroy her for the rest of her days so that she''d be afraid to venture out and try anything to better herself. Abuse in a dysfunctional family is not limited to physical or sexual. Beverly''s parents had no concept about how to raise a child in a healthy environment, even if they had had wealth -- and there was enough financial security and stability to get by; to blame "worries" for their unrelenting emotional bullying and grasping control of their daughter is no excuse. The sacrifices they made for her to go to school don''t merit much forgiveness or understanding to a modern mind. I never understood why so many older people want to suck all the happiness out of the lives of everyone surrounding them. Let them wallow in their own misery, yet they always need to victimize someone else -- or as many people as possible.

I recognize, now, why there seemed to be that "old fashioned" tone in Cleary''s first children''s novels in the early 1950''s about Henry Huggins and the Quimby sisters (and wish there had been more than one book apiece about Ellen Tebbits and Otis Spofford). The careful way of speaking without contractions ("I am" instead of I''m, "can not" instead of can''t, etc, reflects the speech of Beverly''s own stern ex-schoolteacher mother''s early 1900''s vernacular. I don''t think little girls were forced to wear union suit woolen underwear by circa 1950, even in the chilly and rainy Pacific Northwest climate (was woolen underwear still available by then?) , but it''s what Beverly endured in her 1920''s childhood, and much of the slang, antics, and pranks of the Portland neighborhood children reflect that era as well. The author got more modern and "with it" as her characters grew and evolved, and at any rate the kids in her books were always really charming and fun, but having her own kids by the mid-1950''s probably updated her as much as being a former children''s librarian did. I still think 1967''s Mitch and Amy, based on her own twins growing up in an academic university community (Berkeley) is one of the funniest and most realistic books about kids I''d ever read; I still remember it word for word 45+ years later. In fact, exactly 50 years ago is when I began reading Beverly Cleary''s books, during the summer of 1967 when I was six and going into the first grade -- I was a precocious kid already reading at 4th grader level. All of the Henry and Beezus books were available at our local public library, and then in 1968 the first Ramona book came out (I never read any of the other ones of later decades, for I had long outgrown them). The books for teens are really enjoyable, too, and a dishy microcosm of middle-class, 1950''s west coast life -- and somehow the parents in Jean and Johnny, Fifteen, and The Luckiest Girl manage to refrain from being the nightmares of Beverly''s own struggling adolescence. I give her a lot of credit.
27 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Granny Garden
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Brought me to tears
Reviewed in the United States on December 13, 2020
First I read A Girl From Yamhill where I realized that Beverly Cleary''s inspiration for Ramona was herself as a child. I also saw Howie and Henry in her relatives and neighborhood friends. Then I read My Own Two Feet and was moved to tears by the last chapter where she... See more
First I read A Girl From Yamhill where I realized that Beverly Cleary''s inspiration for Ramona was herself as a child. I also saw Howie and Henry in her relatives and neighborhood friends. Then I read My Own Two Feet and was moved to tears by the last chapter where she relates how she actually came up with the ideas for her characters, starting with Henry and Ribsy. When I was in the fourth grade back in 1958 my teacher Mrs. Rice read Henry and Ribsy to us. I was enthralled by Henry''s pluck. Later I became an elementary school teacher myself and read Beverly Cleary stories to every one of my classes for 40 years. It became the best part of the school day for me and for my 1st and 2nd graders. Beverly Cleary''s characters and stories were a huge part of my life and to read how it all started was just amazing to me, very emotional. Her stories and characters are timeless and universal. I highly recommend both of her memoirs. She is an amazing lady.
5 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Kindle Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A delight!
Reviewed in the United States on March 16, 2021
This is a very interesting book about the author''s life after high school. In reading her experiences in college,I found these were used as part of her books. Humorous, poignant,and informative, I truly enjoyed this book and was sorry to discover I was at the end,where she... See more
This is a very interesting book about the author''s life after high school. In reading her experiences in college,I found these were used as part of her books. Humorous, poignant,and informative, I truly enjoyed this book and was sorry to discover I was at the end,where she is first published.
2 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
JC Davenport
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The Librarian
Reviewed in the United States on October 21, 2016
This is the kind of book you get to the end of, and you''re sad. But of course you are biased. At least I am. You don''t just love her books as a kid. You believe them. In my case I even believed in Ralph the Mouse. SMH I wanted to BE Ralph the Mouse. Turns out Beverly... See more
This is the kind of book you get to the end of, and you''re sad. But of course you are biased. At least I am. You don''t just love her books as a kid. You believe them. In my case I even believed in Ralph the Mouse. SMH I wanted to BE Ralph the Mouse. Turns out Beverly wrote that one for her son. Somebody should write a full biography (with footnotes!) of Ms. Cleary. I''ll even give you the title - The Librarian. Cue the cool music . . .

Anyway if you didn''t know, the depression sucked. Not just for the poor but for the "middle class" like Beverly''s family. There are heroes like her grandfather and dad and sympathetic old ladies and well, Beverly. But it sucked. And then the story speeds up - War, love, rebellion and independence and here comes our hero . . . the librarian! Then when she darn well feels like it, she writes books for kids. Books that are for them. And eventually, for me.
5 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
H. S. Wedekind
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A wonderful autobiography!
Reviewed in the United States on June 28, 2008
This was an interesting and thoroughly enjoyable memoir about Beverly Cleary, nee Bunn, as a young woman during the Depression and World War II. The previous reviewers were on target concerning Beverly''s easy writing style and vivid recollections of her family and college... See more
This was an interesting and thoroughly enjoyable memoir about Beverly Cleary, nee Bunn, as a young woman during the Depression and World War II. The previous reviewers were on target concerning Beverly''s easy writing style and vivid recollections of her family and college years: traveling alone by bus from Oregon to California to attend Chaffey Junior College for two years, matriculating to U Cal Berkeley, studying at the U of Washington after graduating from Berkeley to become a librarian, marrying Clarence Cleary (her strained relationship with her mother because of it) and working as a librarian at the US Army''s Camp Knight and Oakland Regional Hospital during WWII, writing and publishing her first children''s book. Many B&W photos of family and friends are included. I highly recommend MY OWN TWO FEET.
11 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Theresa
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Sweet read
Reviewed in the United States on July 2, 2021
This was a sweet read. Although it''s written for older children/ young teens, this is wonderful read for adults interested in Beverly Cleary''s life. It is one of two memoirs capturing different time periods in her early life.
Helpful
Report
KdM
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Beautiful biography
Reviewed in the United States on September 20, 2020
Beverly Cleary’s account of her life is endearing and inspiring, with a simplicity that touches the heart. Her description of school, family, romance, and the historical events surrounding her life are both honest and austere. There is an innocence mixed with tenacity and... See more
Beverly Cleary’s account of her life is endearing and inspiring, with a simplicity that touches the heart. Her description of school, family, romance, and the historical events surrounding her life are both honest and austere. There is an innocence mixed with tenacity and independence in her telling that seems unimaginable nowadays. Any fan of Cleary’s fictional work will enjoy this window into the amazing author’s journey to becoming a writer.
Helpful
Report
Bookhandler Press
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Good Information, Not a Great Read
Reviewed in the United States on December 31, 2019
I loved Cleary''s books when I was young and was eager to read an autobiography. It''s not a great read, but gave me background on who she was.
Helpful
Report

Top reviews from other countries

Meditator
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A good read.
Reviewed in India on May 12, 2019
Well written. All Beverly Cleary fans will enjoy this.
Report
See all reviews
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who viewed this item also viewed

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

What other items do customers buy after viewing this item?

2021 popular My discount Own lowest Two Feet: A Memoir sale

2021 popular My discount Own lowest Two Feet: A Memoir sale

2021 popular My discount Own lowest Two Feet: A Memoir sale

2021 popular My discount Own lowest Two Feet: A Memoir sale

2021 popular My discount Own lowest Two Feet: A Memoir sale

2021 popular My discount Own lowest Two Feet: A Memoir sale

2021 popular My discount Own lowest Two Feet: A Memoir sale

2021 popular My discount Own lowest Two Feet: A Memoir sale

2021 popular My discount Own lowest Two Feet: A Memoir sale

2021 popular My discount Own lowest Two Feet: A Memoir sale

2021 popular My discount Own lowest Two Feet: A Memoir sale

2021 popular My discount Own lowest Two Feet: A Memoir sale

2021 popular My discount Own lowest Two Feet: A Memoir sale

2021 popular My discount Own lowest Two Feet: A Memoir sale

2021 popular My discount Own lowest Two Feet: A Memoir sale

2021 popular My discount Own lowest Two Feet: A Memoir sale

2021 popular My discount Own lowest Two Feet: A Memoir sale

2021 popular My discount Own lowest Two Feet: A Memoir sale